Posts Tagged With: stewardship

A Glimpse in the Rearview Mirror: 2013 (But, keep an eye on the road ahead)

Arrival at the Gulf of Mexico on December 5, 2013.

Arrival at the Gulf of Mexico on December 5, 2013.

On April 14, 2013, I left Columbia, MO, and set out on an extraordinary solo kayak voyage down the 4th longest river system in the world, the 3,800-mile Missouri-Mississippi River System. Upon completing the expedition on December 5, 2013, I became the first American, and first woman, to traverse the entire river system from source to sea. 

Okay. One step at a time. Breathe...

Okay. One step at a time. Breathe…

Packed up and ready to go on April 14, 2013

Packed up and ready to go on April 14, 2013

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My mission began as an empowerment model for our nation’s youth, showing them that dreams can be achieved through decision, desire, and details (and hard work). The mission soon flourished into an empowerment model not only for youth, but for adult women and men as well. At 57 years old, I was living proof that neither gender nor age should prevent you from pursuing your dream. Not only that, the expedition embraced education and environmental stewardship by bringing awareness to Missouri River Relief, a not-for-profit river clean-up and education organization. Our hope is to bring the Missouri River into the classroom, and the classroom out to the river. Touching the river, knowing the river, and loving the river are key ingredients to sustaining the health and vitality of our planet’s veins and arteries. 

Welcoming party in Memphis, TN

Welcoming party in Memphis, TN

Bringing the classroom out to the river.

Bringing the classroom out to the river. Photo by Missouri River Relief

The next generation

The next generation-Photo by Missouri River Relief

The adventure began on April 24, 2013, when Norman Miller and I skied into the ultimate source of the Missouri River, Brower’s Spring, in southern Montana near West Yellowstone. We planned for 7 hours and finished in 31 hours, much to our surprise. We spent the night in the mountains with no sleeping gear, food, or fire. Let the adventure begin! 

After a 30-year absence I was delighted to be ski mountaineering again.

After a 30-year absence I was delighted to be ski mountaineering again.

Our shelter for the night and our celebratory beer now turned calorie provider.

Our impromptu shelter and our celebratory beer, now turned carbo provider.

Conditions could have been life-threatening with any kind of weather. As it was, we layed awake all night shivering.

Conditions could have been life-threatening with any kind of weather. As it was, we just layed awake all night shivering.

The next leg involved biking 100 miles through the Centennial Valley. This dirt road traversed Red Rock River to Clark Canyon Dam. The Red Rock River is not paddler friendly as it is full of man-made dams composed of barbed wire, wood, electrical wire, and corrugated sheet metal. I put my kayak in the Beaverhead River below Clark Canyon Dam on May 1, 2013. The Beaverhead eventually turns into the Jefferson River, which becomes the Missouri River about 200 miles downstream at Three Forks, MT.

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Any amount of rain would have rendered this road useless for travel, car OR bike, because of the mud. My expedition was blessed with ideal weather conditions.

Red Rock River obstruction

Red Rock River obstruction, one of dozens, making paddling slow, laborious, and dangerous.

My first day was a test of will as I became entangled in a tree strainer, spraining my hand and nearly dumping my boat. On day two, I put two holes in my boat, thankfully above water line, as the swift and narrow Beaverhead River made it difficult to avoid collisions with snags along shore. Nothing a little duct tape couldn’t fix! After 11 days of paddling I arrived at Three Forks, where I then regrouped at Norm Millers’ Base Camp International in Livingston, MT, patched the holes in my boat, and set off down the Missouri River at Three Forks on May 15, 2013. The rest, really, is history as I proceeded to live life on the river, with simplicity and joy, for the next seven months.

This photo, along with the sunset pic below, were the most popular expedition posts. Taken on the Beaverhead River, Day 1 on the water.

A bad omen? Perish the thought. Onward! On the Beaverhead River

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The Beaverhead River, where you can find a predicament around every corner.

First-time fiberglass patcher-two holes

First-time fiberglass patcher-two holes, no less.

On the Jefferson River. Photo courtesy of Norm Miller

On the Jefferson River (with duct tape patches). Photo courtesy of Norm Miller

I will cherish this expedition until the day I die.  I experienced challenging decision-making, marvelously mellow mornings, exasperating electrical storms, wild wind and waves, stunning sunsets, random acts of kindness, unforgettable human river angels, the wonders of wildlife, big huge barges, even bigger and huger freighters ;), and frightening fog. Last but not least I met a whole world of beautiful and extraordinary supporters up and down the river to whom I cannot give enough thanks, and whom I now consider river family.

Please enjoy a few expedition photos I picked out, in no logical order, but which are among some of my favorites. You may remember…

Friends from the first day to the last. Love my pelicans.

Friends from the first day to the last. Love my pelicans.

Hiking on windy Fort Peck Lake

Hiking on windy Fort Peck Lake

Have never seen another quite so stunning as this sunset

Have never seen another quite so stunning as this sunset

Well, it IS the Big Muddy!

Well, it IS the Big Muddy!

The morning after the worst electrical storm of the trip. Fort Peck Lake

The morning after the worst electrical storm of the trip. Fort Peck Lake

Nearing the Montana-North Dakota border

Below Fort Peck Lake, I think. Still muddy, but getting better.

Gates of the Rocky Mountains

Gates of the Rocky Mountains – Holter Lake, MT

Gates of the Rocky Mountains. Hard to leave this wondrous place

Gates of the Rocky Mountains. Hard to leave this wondrous place. Corps of Discovery camped right across the river.

The stoic bald eagle

The stoic bald eagle

Tow and barge on the Mississippi River

Tow and barge on the Mississippi River

A very special heart stone found just below the Ohio River confluence

A very special heart stone found just below the Ohio River confluence

New Orleans

New Orleans

Sharing the Mississippi River with tankers and freighters, always keeping one eye in front and one eye to the rear. They are quiet vessels.

Sharing the lower Mississippi River with tankers and freighters, always keeping one eye in front and one eye to the rear. They are quiet vessels.

My stellar support crew in the Gulf fog

My stellar Gulf support crew in the Gulf fog

The fog just lifted as we began crossing the Head of Passes. Nothing short of a miracle.

The fog just lifted as we began crossing the Head of Passes using a hand-held GPS device. This was a super exhilarating moment. Unforgettable. Even the ship pilot crossing the pass remembers the moment I came into view.

Yes, the pilot of this ship. Pilottown crew were stellar support on this stretch manning the radio communication.

Yes, the pilot of this ship. Pilottown crew provided much comfort on this stretch with their radio communication and hospitality. I am so thankful for them.

Grizzly bear track below Hell Roaring Canyon. Photo taken by my daughter Haley who was sleeping in a car with Jeannie, waiting for us to come out after a 24 hour delay.

Grizzly bear track below Hell Roaring Canyon. Photo taken by my daughter Haley who was sleeping in a car with Jeannie, waiting for us to come out after a 24 hour delay.

Buffalo skull next to my camp that speaks historical volumes

Buffalo skull found next to my camp below Fort Benton, MT, that speaks historical volumes.

Bridge City Marina, home of special river angels

Bridge City Marina in Mobridge, SD, home of very special river angel, Michael Norder and his lovely family.

Hole in the Wall, Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument

Hole in the Wall, Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, MT

Making camp

Making camp

Curious Pronghorn Deer

Curious pronghorn antelope in Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge

Sweet heart blue hole on the Mississippi River

Sweet heart blue hole on the middle Mississippi River

The Natchez of New Orleans.

The Natchez of New Orleans.

Great Horned Owl Babies in Great Falls, MT

Great Horned Owl Babies in Great Falls, MT

One of several lone pelicans escorting me down the South Pass to bid me farewell, I think

One of several lone pelicans escorting me down the South Pass to bid me farewell. BFF

Please visit my sponsor page at the top of my site to see the wonderful companies that believed in me and helped me out in some way to ease the financial burden. Special thanks to Patagonia for their generous clothing sponsorship. Eddyline for their excellent service with my boat as well as donating the best paddle I could ever imaging taking, a Swift Paddle. Many heart-felt thanks to all of Columbia, Mo’s outdoor shops for donating items to LoveYourBigMuddy. Huge thanks especially to our Klunk Bikes for re’cycling’ me a bike, which I love very much to this day.

And to every person that was able to donate financially, I know who you are and you will NOT be forgotten. Particularly my local Riverbilly family and those contributing to the Blues Benefit. Click here to see who these tremendous supporters of LoveYourBigMuddy are. This was YOUR expedition! THANK YOU! If you see a photo you would like on this post and it is part of your donation reward, please email me and let me know. I will be posting more photos shortly.

For a comprehensive view of media articles and podcasts, click here to visit my media page, located at the top of the site.

Lastly, warm thoughts go out to the crew at Canoe and Kayak Magazine, and to all of the individuals who took a moment to vote LoveYourBigMuddy Expedition into the “Spirit of Adventure” Award arena for 2014. Certainly, the honor was all mine to receive the award in the midst of an incredible paddling family. YOU, too, can be a candidate for such a cool recognition. Just…

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Dave Shively, editor, and one of many very cool people who have created this outstanding paddling magazine and helped to create an international paddling family. Three cheers!!! Click here to visit the award ceremony.

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…remember to keep your eyes on the road ahead. Don’t quit your DayDream. And, dream BIG!

LoveYourBigMuddy Expedition on Facebook. see what’s up…

Oh, one last thing, a toast to LoveYourBigMuddy

Still reeling from the high

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Categories: Expedition, Missouri River | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Post-Expedition Update (July1-2014): Lower Brule Sioux Reservation, SD

Sunset on Lake Sharpe

Sunset on Lake Sharpe, SD

“So, Janet, what’s your next adventure?” A popular question about which I have been asked many times. For awhile there I began to believe I could go on another expedition. I began researching the Amazon River and contacted my friends on Facebook who have paddled it already, namely Mark Kalch and West Hanson. Man oh man, what an awesome adventure THAT would be! Not only do I have an interest in South America, but to paddle the second longest river in the world??? Solo?! We are talking real-deal adventure! Too bad about the Class V+ white water on that 500-mile section…hmmm, do I REALLY want to risk my life? How could I ever pay for such a thing? How long will it take? How DO those adventurers DO it???
Back to reality. Spending 7.5 months on an expedition is costly. I am so thankful for my supporters along the way who carried me through financially, but the money hole that awaited me post-expedition was, or is, enormous. I left on my expedition with pocket change, and came home with the same.
That said, I began researching an adventure that was drifting around in the back of my mind, something I have always been interested in and have wanted to learn more about. I needed to find an adventure during which I could work and make some money. To begin my inquiry I made the initial phone call to the Lower Brule Sioux Indian Reservation School in south-central South Dakota. I wondered if they needed any teachers. This could be a cultural journey for which I could get paid while immersed in it. I had started the ball rolling, one that is currently moving right along at a pretty good clip. In fact, I will be moving to South Dakota next month to teach 6th-grade at the Lower Brule Day school. Now, ask me what my next adventure is going to be!  🙂
This boat ramp was not on my map but a welcome sight since I did not have time to make it to Lower Brule this day.

Upriver from the town of Lower Brule, this boat ramp was not on my map but a welcome sight since I did not have time to make it to Lower Brule this day.

This boat ramp was so beautiful and a pleasant place to camp.

This boat ramp was so beautiful and a pleasant place to camp.

Not a whole lot to do once I set up camp at the Little Bend Boat Ramp, so I picked up trash.

Not a whole lot to do once I set up camp at the Little Bend Boat Ramp, so I picked up trash.

I had lots of company at the boat ramp camp

I had lots of company at the boat ramp camp

Busy boat ramp popular with the fishermen and families. Everyone was very friendly, that night and the next morning. The fishermen were there at the crack of dawn, as I recall.

Busy boat ramp popular with the fishermen and families. Everyone was very friendly, that night and the next morning. The fishermen were there at the crack of dawn, as I recall.

I visited Lower Brule Sioux reservation while on expedition. I landed in Chamberlain, South Dakota, on Thursday, August 9, 2013, which is downstream a few hours, below Big Bend Dam. My campsite was at the beautiful American Creek Campground located on the waterfront shore of Lake Francis Case. Jessica Giard was my river contact in Chamberlain, at that time the editor of the local town paper. We enjoyed each other’s company very much and made arrangements to drive to the Powwow at Lower Brule on Sunday, August 11, 2013.
A photo of me during expedition taken by fellow long-distance paddler David Forbes. We met at Big Bend Dam and paddled to Chamberlain together.

A photo of me during expedition taken by fellow long-distance paddler David Forbes. We met at Big Bend Dam and paddled to Chamberlain together.

David Forbes, me, and Jessica Andrews Giard enjoying dinner together at the Marina in Chamberlain, SD.

David Forbes, me, and Jessica Andrews Giard, Chamberlain River Angel, enjoying dinner together at the Marina in Chamberlain, SD.

I was intrigued with the Powwow event and the display of American Indian culture. Lower Brule reservation is located right on the shores of Lake Sharpe. I took lots of photos, met some unique and interesting individuals, and thoroughly enjoyed the regalia, dancing and music at the event, the latter of which consisted of many different drum circles. This was a highlight of my expedition.
My favorite photo of the journey, these American Indian girls smiled so big for the photo. They appear to be near the age I will be teaching this year, which is 6th grade.

My favorite photo of the journey, these American Indian girls smiled so big for the photo. They appear to be near the age I will be teaching this year, which is 6th grade.

I think this was the opening dance when all participate. Spectacular!

I think this was the opening dance when all participate. Spectacular!

The costume, drums and dance made for some spell-binding events

The regalia, drums and dance made for some spell-binding events.

One of the many drum circles competing at the Powwow

One of the many drum circles competing at the Powwow

Jessica Giard, Chamberlain river angel, asking a few questions for a write-up in the Chamberlain newspaper.

Jessica Andrews Giard, Chamberlain river angel, asking a few questions for a write-up in the Chamberlain newspaper.

I was awestruck at the traditional costumes on display this day.

I was awestruck at the traditional regalia on display this day.

Truth be known, this one melted my heart.

Truth be known, this one melted my heart.

Lower Brule is reorganizing its school system to achieve sustainable success. The Tribal Council is working with AIII (A-Triple i), the American Indian Institute for Innovation, making uplifting and relevant changes to achieve post-secondary attendance by graduating high school students who will, ultimately, return to the reservation with their education, leadership skills and innovative ideas. The schools are hoping to achieve an increase in performance standards. I believe the changes in-progress will manifest success and benefits to the Lower Brule community.
Preferring not to commute the 30 minutes to Chamberlain to live, leaving school at the bell and returning at 7:00 AM, I asked the consulting team leading the reorganization if they could find me housing on the reservation. Indeed, they DID find for me a modest inexpensive home to rent just a few blocks from the school. I felt this arrangement was important for immersion with the community and building relationships.
LoveYourBigMuddy Expedition was a life-changing journey like I never expected. After seven and one-half months living simply on the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, I now know that my days will continue to be unique while trying to avoid ordinary affairs. Living life outside of the box is stimulating and rewarding. I refuse to melt into an armchair positioned in front of a television or a desk chair in front of a computer screen (well, maybe a little of the latter). Life is so short and at 57 years I can feel the pressure of time passing. So much to do and so little time!
I took this photo on glassy waters as I paddled past Lower Brule.

I took this photo on glassy waters as I paddled past Lower Brule.

A little northern squall heading right for me on Lake Sharpe near Lower Brule. After I hauled everything up out of the water and covered up with a tarp, the storm broke apart. That was good, I guess, even though I was prepared for it.

It did not take long for this northern squall to move in. Luckily it broke up over the river after I had moved my boat and gear and me away from the water.

The journey is not over until the mission bears fruit. The goals of LoveYourBigMuddy Expedition include 1) empowering youth (women and men) to confidently pursue their dreams and desires 2) conducting effective education in the natural environment, which includes bringing the Missouri River into the classroom and the classroom out to the river and 3) preparing the next generation for impactful stewardship of our nation’s waterways. Purposeful living embodies the spirit of adventure. Yep, that’s my story and I’m sticking to it.
Coming out from under my tarp which I used to cover me in a squall. The rain never really came as the storm broke up over the river.

Coming out from under my tarp which I used to cover myself in a squall.

Do what you love, and love what you do!
See you on the river!! syotr
Sunrise on Lake Sharpe

Sunrise on Lake Sharpe

See You On The River!

See You On The River!

Categories: Education, Expedition | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Christening the Boat, Gearing up and Cleaning the River

“For thousands of years, we have gone to sea. We have crafted vessels to carry us and we have called them by name. These ships will nurture and care for us through perilous seas, and so we affectionately call them “she.” To them we toast, and ask to celebrate “BLUE MOON.” Then everybody raises their glass filled with champagne or your favorite non-alcoholic beverage and shouts, “TO THE SAILORS OF OLD…TO BLUE MOON.” Everybody takes a sip.

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That is the start of the script for the christening ceremony.  Tomorrow, a.k.a., Easter Sunday, Blue Moon will take her first ride in the Missouri River as the Blue Moon.  For those of you who are not aware, Bob Bellingham of Australia paddled down the Missouri River last summer in the same boat, which was then the Barbara May.  In the spirit of  “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle,” I have purchased Bob’s boat for my expedition, and she is no stranger to the river.

Bob Bellingham in his Shasta, which is now my Shasta, and my ride down the river.

Bob Bellingham in his Shasta, which is now my Shasta,
and my ride down the river.

The Barbara May brought Bob down the river, from Three Forks to St. Louis, in 89 days.  Ideally, Blue Moon will replicate that schedule so that I arrive in St. Louis on August 1st (give or take a couple of days).  Tomorrow, I will conduct a short ceremony in order to loosely hold on to the tradition of renaming and/or christening a boat.  Those paddling with me, and anyone else interested, are invited to take part.

Today, I hope to apply this blog site address onto the sides of Blue Moon.

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Things are really revving up, gear-wise.  Packages are showing up on my porch, such as the lettering for my web address, my solar panel, compression dry sacks, my sleeping bag, a camera, cleaner for the boat deck, etc.

I spent 3 hours in Batteries + yesterday trying to assemble an appropriate electronic system to charge my laptop from the roll-up solar panel.  Solar panels do not advertise laptop charging.  Normally, they are geared for only the smaller electronic appliances, i.e., iPhone, iPad, camera, or GPS.  After yesterday,  I’m ready to teach a Physics lesson for sure.

I had to get a 12V battery, which I learned, come in a wide variety of sizes and corresponding weights.  I need a battery that will not be too big, but that will charge my laptop up in a reasonable amount of time and/or charging sessions.  I won’t go into any details because my brain is still tired from yesterday’s numerous calculations.  Big thanks to Herb for patiently assisting me in assembling a system!  And thanks to Chad, Batteries+ store owner, who gave me a business account, which results in a small discount on all of the accessories I bought…

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for my roll-up solar charger.  Big thanks to Julia at PowerFilmSolar for the discount, too.

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One of the employees at Batteries+ suggested a wind turbine for the boat.  Holy cow, that’s brilliant!  I’m sure I’ll be thinking a lot about that on those windy days on the lakes!

I have been dehydrating lots of food and vacuum sealing small packages.  Why have I not been doing this for the last 30 years?  The beef jerky is out of this world!  And, the bananas, green apples, pineapple, etc. are all soooo delicious! I’ve also dried tomatoes, onions, mushrooms, peppers, and spaghetti sauce.  Yep, spaghetti sauce.  Starting on broccoli today.  These veggies will be wonderful to throw into my side dish pasta meals.

Dried-Tomatoes-mushrooms

Naturally dried tomatoes and mushrooms

I now have my tent, sleeping bag, stove, Thermarest, paddling gear, under layers, neoprene boots and shoes, Teva sandals, portable hard drive, three cameras, an iPhone, a laptop (which I’ve owned for a long time and hope it performs), maps, drybags, compression dry bags, compass, whistle, wheeleez for portaging, and a lot of little items that I had to pick up as I walked through Walt’s Wilderness store.  Little things like a first-aid kit, meal kit, coffee french-press with cup set, moleskin, caribiners, and a wide-mouth water bottle for my alfalfa sprouts.  I even picked up my one and only packaged freeze-dried meal:  camp eggs!  I love eggs and will need to cook up this package for some special occasion, which could be anything, like one full day with zero wind!!  I may be missing my eggs on this trip.

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I will test my gear this week-end when I go to Missouri River Relief’s MO River clean-up in St. Charles.  Seven years have passed since I started back to school and have not had an opportunity to go to a river clean-up since.  These clean-up events are a must-do activity for everyone, ESPECIALLY, river communities.  The sense of accomplishment, camaraderie, and contribution to society cannot be fully appreciated until you take part in one.  I am so looking forward to being with fellow river stewards, cleaning up the trash, and trying out the gear that I will become one with for the next 3 and 1/2 months.  I definitely have to make sure that French Press works.  Gotta have my cup of Joe to get my day on track!

Confluence Clean-Up in 2012.  Jeannie Kuntz massages the crew (She'll be driving to Montana with me and my daughter Haley. :))

Confluence Clean-Up in 2012. Jeannie Kuntz massages the crew after a long day. (Jeannie will be driving to Montana with my daughter Haley and me. :))

St. Charles Clean-up in 2011

River Warriors
St. Charles Clean-up in 2011

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Stay tuned for an upcoming post in which I will share with you the red-hot heart-warming LoveYourBigMuddy Blues Benefit from last Wednesday, March 27.

Live fast ~ Paddle slow

See you on the river!

Categories: Expedition, Planning | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

From the Journals of Lewis and Clark

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White Cliffs in Missouri River Breaks National Monument
(Photo by Norm Miller)

From The Journals of Lewis and Clark -edited by Bernard DeVoto

[Lewis] Friday May 31st 1805

“The hills and river Clifts which we passed today exhibit a most romantic appearance…The earth on the top of these Clifts is a dark rich loam, which forming a graduly ascending plain extends back from ½ a mile to a mile where the hills commence and rise abruptly to a hight of about 300 feet more.

…in other places on a much nearer approach and with the help of less imagination we see the remains or ruins of elegant buildings; some columns standing and almost entire with their pedestals and capitals; others retaining their pedestals but deprived by time or accident of their capitals, some lying prostrate an broken othe[r]s in the form of vast pyramids of conic structure bearing a serees of other pyramids on their tops becoming less as they ascend and finally terminating in a sharp point.

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White Cliffs (Photo by Norm Miller)

Nitches and alcoves of various forms and sizes are seen at different hights as we pass…As we passed on it seemed as if those seens of visionary inchantment would never have and [an] end; for here it is too that nature presents to the view of the traveller vast ranges of walls of tolerable workmanship…These walls rise to the hight in many places of 100 feet, are perpendicular, with two regular faces and are from one to 12 feet thick, each wall retains the same thickness at top which it possesses at bottom.”

(Photos by Norm Miller)
White Cliffs in the Missouri River Breaks National Monument, MT

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White Cliffs (Photo by Norm Miller)

I still have a lot to learn, but I cannot for the life of me think of a reason why anyone would NOT want The Missouri River Breaks National Monument preserved as a wilderness area for future generations.  Nope, cannot think of one reason.

Categories: Missouri River, The Route | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Hermann Community Impromptu River Clean-Up Admirable

What if ALL Missouri River communities were so motivated?  Wow!  Impressive!

And, it was bitter cold yesterday…

“The fact that 16 volunteers made it to the clean-up with less than 36 hours notice on a holiday weekend is testimony to the commitment and enthusiasm these people have for the river. ”

For full story click HERE

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Categories: Missouri River, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Riches Much Finer Than Gold

The most wonderful thing happened to me at the Missouri Environmental Education Association (MEEA) mini-conference yesterday.  I walked away from the event with the most amazing book; it is a compilation of educational lessons and activities about the Upper Mississippi River. Erin Hilligoss-Volkmann of the Army Corps of Engineers gave a presentation, and I was one of the lucky ones to receive one of three copies she brought along.  I asked her if I could post some things about the book on my blog, and she said, “Yes.”

Cover

This book is the manifestation in the physical realm of what I have been envisioning in my mind as it relates the Missouri River.  Only it goes way beyond what I imagined possible.  It is complete, thorough, comprehensive, beautifully illustrated, and bursting with amazing science and social studies lessons and activities.  I’d say the book is somewhat like a dream-come-true, and gives my trip a rich new perspective.

Well deserved kudos go out to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), the Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability Program (NESP) Cultural Resources and Stewardship Mitigation Team in La Crosse, WI, and design team led by Formations.

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Standards

This book is given to facilitators at a workshop in which they are trained to train teachers to teach students about the upper Mississippi River.  Here are the titles to the units:

Unit 1 Introduction to the Upper Mississippi River Watershed

Unit 2 Introduction to Upper Mississippi River Ecosystems

Unit 3 Introduction to Mississippi River History and Culture

Unit 4 Introduction to the Mississippi River at Work

Unit 5 Introduction to A Shared Resource – Our Mississippi River

Here’s a peak at some of the activities:

Watershed

RiverBirds

AncientCivilizations

BlancheLeathers

Navigate

SteamboatEra

ControllingtheRiver

WellRiverCheckUp

Content includes activities relating to river habitats, glacial history, plants, animals, and habitats of the Upper Miss, bird migration, endangered species, Mississippi’s ancient civilizations, Native Americans, settlement and transportation, Underground Railroad, watershed occupations, steam power, Mark Twain, Lewis and Clark, floods, locks, dams, water safety, and caring for the river, among many other subjects.  The book even includes profiles of people important to the river today, such as Michael Clark and his Big Muddy Adventures.

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Sustainability

To be honest, I am quite speechless as I look through this treasure chest of river education tools.  Seems reasonable and logical to have a complimentary Missouri River resource such as this, full of  riches much finer than gold.

Ahhh, the possibilities!

Categories: Education, Reflection | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Three Cheers to our Inconspicuous Victors this last Week-end!!!

Victory in St. Joseph!

So many victories on the rivers this last week end!  Hats off and kudos to these awe-inspiring challenges and extraordinary achievements.  But the humblest of all heroes are in St. Joseph and they deserve our attention, too.  First, though, a recap of events:

Mark Kalch is first man to paddle the Missouri River from source to Gulf, completing two out of seven of the longest rivers on seven continents.  http://www.7rivers7continents.com/worlds-end/

Dave Corthwaite swims 1000 miles of the Missouri River and pulls into the St. Louis Arch having completed his trek with his team.  https://www.facebook.com/expedition1000

Tyler Ranes and Tom Walker finish their (aluminum) canoe trip from Great Falls, Montana, to New Orleans.  https://www.facebook.com/tyler.ranes.5?ref=ts&fref=ts

Brent Mills and Hunter from Greenville, South Carolina had reached the Gulf the very morning Mark Kalch did, having paddled the length of the Mississippi River from Lake Ithasca.  https://www.facebook.com/brent.mill?ref=ts&fref=ts

 Dom Liboiron Canoeing to New Orleans in Memory of my Uncle Mitch, Rod Wellington https://www.facebook.com/rod.wellington.9?ref=ts&fref=ts , and Matthew Batton https://www.facebook.com/matthew.batten.73?ref=ts&fref=ts are still paddling on the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers.

But let me tell you about the unsung heroes on the Missouri River.  The citizens of St. Joseph, Missouri, under the leadership of Missouri River Relief, spent a cold day on the river cleaning up trash from its river banks on Saturday.  Different strokes for different folks (no pun intended), these adults, children, men, and women reaped unforgettable rewards and earned quiet respect because of their selfless service to help make our Big Muddy one of the cleanest and finest rivers in all the land.

Three cheers to River Relief and the folks in St. Joseph!!!  You should stand tall among the victories that graced our mighty waterways this last week-end, October 6, 2012.

(Clean up photos by Rachel Beck  www.rachelbeckphotos.com )

Categories: Expedition, Missouri River | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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