Posts Tagged With: GPS

The Ultimate Source of the Missouri River-Brower’s Spring

Sawtelle Peak FAA Road gate.

Sawtelle Peak FAA Road gate.

The first thing we needed to do to get the Brower’s Spring was to get throught the Federal Aviation Administration gate that guards the road up Sawtelle Peak.  We needed to ske from one of the switchbacks over to Jefferson Peak and up and over the Continental Divide into the Hell Roaring Creek Drainage where the spring is located.

Curt Judy unlocked the gate for us so we could ski over to Jefferson Peak from the road switchback. Thanks, Curt!

Curt Judy unlocked the gate for us so we could ski over to Jefferson Peak from the road switchback. Thanks, Curt!

Mount Jefferson from on top of the bowl.

Mount Jefferson from on top of the bowl.

This is the top of Mount Jefferson which stands at 10,200 ft. We traversed the top of the bowl and dropped into the Hell Roaring Creek drainage off to the left.  This was a spectacular moment in the ski.

You can see the Teton Range from on top.

You can see the Teton Range from on top.

Sometime at the beginning of our ski in to the spring.

Sometime at the beginning of our ski in to the spring.

Your can see the triangle where I am standing and the push pin where the spring coordinates are, almost touching.

Your can see the triangle where I am standing and the push pin where the spring coordinates are, almost touching.

GPS showed me I was soooooo close to the spring.  The surroundings indicated to me that I was likely standing on or near the spring. I could feel it in my heart and soul. My heart was racing and I was excited.

Brower's Spring just inside the trees in center of photo.

Brower’s Spring just inside the trees in center of photo.

I skied out of those trees where I am sure I was on or near the spring. Rod Wellington, who has also been there, confirmed that the area looked familiar to him.

We even got some turns in.

We even got some turns in. Unfortunately, no photos of our figure eights. Darn!

We assumed that the trip would entail an easy seven-mile ski out of Hell Roaring Canyon.  We were mistaken. Because of the snow cover, we needed to be cautious of avalanche danger, and often fell prey to terrain traps, which produced steep drop-offs, false canyons, and unskiable gulleys.  Because of this, we were destined to stay over night, which neither of us prepared for. In fact, we absent-mindedly left the car with no means of fire or sleeping gear. We were both tense until we gave in to the fact we were staying the night.  Then, our priority switched to surviving the night. We never doubted our ability to do so.

We were at the top of that distant ridge at one point. You could see the Sawtoothe Range in Idaho.

We were at the top of that distant ridge at one point. You could see the Sawtoothe Range in Idaho. We had to be vigilant about avalanche danger.

Norm getting water from Hell Roaring Creek.

Norm getting water from Hell Roaring Creek. At this point we knew we were sleeping in the mountains.

Norm building the shelter.

Norm building the shelter. We both took part in this important project.

The PBR Haley threw in our pack. Happy we had the extra calories before a long cold night.

The PBR Haley threw in our pack. Happy we had the extra calories before a long cold night.

I shivered uncontrollably all night. I was only able to sleep for about five minutes. Norm was the same way. Somehow, the hours past and it was time to go. I am thankful to have survived and avoided hypothermia. I had trailmix to eat and a granola bar which we split. I had to eat one of the granola bars for calories just after going to bed. Perhaps, it helped, I could not tell.

Beautiful full moon night, despite the situation.

Beautiful full moon night, despite the situation.

Hell Roaring Creek

Hell Roaring Creek

We skied 12 miles instead of 7 because of terrain traps that forced us to back up and go another way.

We skied 12 miles instead of 7 because of terrain traps that forced us to
back up and go another way.

Grizzly Tracks.  We made ourselves known by talking at the bear for the last couple hours of our ski.

Grizzly tracks. We made ourselves known by talking at the bear for
the last couple hours of our ski.

The end finally in sight.  And, so were the bear tracks, which came up from the valley where Haley and Jeannie were.

The end finally in sight. And, so were the bear tracks, which came up from the valley where Haley and Jeannie were sleeping in the car.

Haley and Jeannie, support crew, waiting patiently for us. We had minimal contact with walkie talkies that we brought, so we were able to notify them of our overnight stay.

Haley and Jeannie, support crew, waiting patiently for us. We had minimal contact with walkie talkies that we brought, so we were able to notify them of our overnight stay.

Here is the grizzly track Haley took a photo of at the base of Hell Roaring Canyon, where we came out.

Here is the grizzly track Haley took a photo of
at the base of Hell Roaring Canyon, where we came out.

Job Well Done-Norm and Me

Oh my God, we did it! Good job!

Next came the bike ride, 90-some miles from the base of Hell Roaring Canyon to Clark Canyon Dam.  The ride took three days. The ride of all rides, the vistas were spectacular.

Categories: Expedition | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

SPOT Rocks

I applied to be a SPOT ambassador some time ago and received a response yesterday, December 19.  They have offered a pretty sweet deal, I think.

First company sponsorship (thanks SPOT)

Thank you, Liana, for not blowing me off.  You are my first “big company” sponsorship (if a promo deal can be considered a sponsorship).  I look forward to carrying your product on board.

Here is the message I received.  Just need to fill out the paperwork.   YES!

Hello Janet –

 Thank you for completing the SPOT Brand Ambassador Form.  We have thoroughly reviewed your request and responded to you as promptly as possible.  We feel you are offering a unique opportunity to showcase SPOT. Therefore, we are offering you an exclusive SPOT offer. Attached please find a form which will allow you to purchase a SPOT, plus one year of basic service and tracking for $99 (typically a $250 value).

 Once your form is completed, you will need to send it to Tom Babb via fax at 985.335.1790 or email to Thomas.Babb@FindMeSPOT.com.

 Liana Narcisse

Marketing Coordinator

Globalstar

Categories: Planning, Sponsorship | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Do what you love and love what you do.

Update:

I am having a conversation with Eddyline regarding their Shasta kayak, my boat of choice for the trip.  They’ve also offered discounted gear.

Bob Bellingham’s Shasta kayak and gear

I will meet with Bob Bellingham this week when he paddles by Cooper’s Landing.  Hoping to pick his brain regarding his trip which began at Three Forks, Montana.  He is headed for St. Louis.  We will also discuss the possibility of me purchasing his Shasta kayak, which he would keep for himself if he didn’t have to fly the boat home to Australia.

My dear niece, Rene Freels from St. Louis, mentioned creating a promotional video for the expedition, and a kick-starter campaign.  Sounds like a good idea.

Discussing ideas with Charlotte Overby, beloved in our river community, and currently River Coordinator for Conservation Lands Foundation.

Researching GPS possibilities.  Is SPOT a form of GPS, or a different system altogether?  Is it enough?  Suggestions welcome.

Student teaching is now pulling on my right hand while expedition planning is pulling on my left.

The more I learn, the greater my vision.

May seems so far away, yet so close.  I long to begin the trip with all of its uncertainties.  The thrill of adventure beckons me.

I will sleep when I get old.

live fast ~ paddle slow

syotr

Here is a short clip on what to expect on the lakes regularly:

Categories: Planning | Tags: , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

1woman 3great rivers

Missouri River 2013 - Mississippi River 2016 - Yukon River 2017

%d bloggers like this: